A CONFUSED and divided USA

A CONFUSED and divided USA

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        BAD KINDLE AMAZON BOOKS SYSTEM.I REDUCED THIS BOOKD PRICE TO 3 USD BUT IT IS STILL DISPLAYING 19 USD DESPITE REMINDERS German and American Views on ISI OF PAKISTAN https://www.amazon.com/dp/1698610882/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_apa_glc_fabc_ZR3FCAPMMCR6V5QSYRBH    MC CONNELL is an architect of decline of US democracy. It's been down hill since Gingrich.
Liberals push for Justice Stephen Breyer, 82, to resign from Supreme Court after Mitch McConnell says he will BLOCK any Biden Supreme Court nomination during the 2024 election year if Republicans take back control
 
     Liberals took to Twitter on Monday to demand 82-yar-old Justice Stephen Breyer resign so they can get some new blood while they still can 
    The renewed calls came after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said he would block President Joe Biden 's Supreme Court nominees in 2024 
    'I don't think either party, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election,' McConnell said
    Some Congress members have already called for the 82-year-old justice to resign amid remarks he gave suggesting court packing may be a bad idea
    On Sunday, House Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said she would be 'inclined' to call on Breyer to step down so Biden could appoint younger justices
REVEALED: Trump pressured AG Bill Barr's replacement Jeffrey Rosen to probe voter fraud and chief of staff Mark Meadows pushed theory Italy used satellites to move votes to Biden
 
    Newly released emails show former President Trump and his top allies bringing the president's claims of election fraud to top Justice Department officials
    Trump was seeking to stay in power and overturn election results
    Trump aide wrote Bill Barr's replacement just an hour before Barr stepped down
    Chief of Staff Mark Meadows pushed theory of Italian vote-rigging in U.S.
    Trump pushed legal brief to have Supreme Court overturn vote in six states 
    DOJ guidance cautions against White House involvement in probes 
 
 
American Democracy Isn’t Dead Yet, but It’s Getting There
A country that cannot even agree to investigate an assault on its Capitol is in big trouble, indeed.
 
Democracy is on life support. Do we have what it takes to resuscitate it? 
 
 
In Democracy in America — written at a time when the prospects of American democracy looked a good deal rosier than they do today — Alexis de Tocqueville observes that laws do more to shape the American republic than do the accidental benefits of geography, but that “custom,” which he defines as “the various notions and opinions current among men,” whether in the sphere of religion or civic life, has more influence than either. The word we use today for that mass of unexamined opinion is “norms.” Here L & Z make what seems to me a very important contribution to our understanding of why we’re heading wherever it is we’re heading. Functioning democracies, they argue, depend on two norms: mutual tolerance and forbearance.
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This, then, is how democracies die: through the slow erosion of norms that underpin democratic institutions. Or perhaps we have the disease right, but the patient wrong. What does it mean to say that democracy is endangered when Donald Trump and Hungary’s Viktor Orban and Poland’s Law and Justice party were elected fair and square? Maybe the something that is dying is not “democracy.” According to Yascha Mounk, who is on the faculty at Harvard just like L & Z, democracy, understood as a political system designed to assure majority rule, is doing just fine, indeed all too well; what is under threat are the values we have in mind when we speak of “liberal democracy.” (The People vs. Democracy is an oddly misleading title; Mounk’s actual subject is “the people vs. liberalism,” or “liberalism vs. democracy,” though some editor must have prevailed on him to swallow the Godzilla vs. Mothra version.)

Mounk traces the rise of populist parties across Europe. What these parties have in common, he writes, is an eagerness to seize on majoritarian mechanisms — above all, the ballot — in order to promote a vision hostile to individual rights, the rule of law, respect for political and ethnic minorities, and the willingness to seek complex solutions to complex problems. This is illiberal democracy. “Democracy without rights,” as Mounk also calls it, is both a reaction to, and a provocation for, “rights without democracy,” or “undemocratic liberalism” — a formulation first made by the Dutch political scientist Cas Mudde, though not credited here. Where majorities do not support liberal rights, or where it is reasonable to fear they won’t, elites create mechanisms, including judicial review, federal bureaucracies, international treaty bodies, that are only indirectly answerable to the public. Is that good, or bad? L & Z’s “guardrails” are Mounk’s abridgements of democracy. How, then are we to think about the relationship between liberalism and democratic majorities?
Democracy Is Dying by Natural Causes
From Nazis to Newt Gingrich, a brief survey of the many ways government-by-the-people can perish from the earth.
I think America is heading for a confederation.
I find it is hilarious that GOP acts as if knows how to run economy when  rich states are Democratic and it governs the less well off and more financially challenged states. I think Dem states will say go be by yourself; and that is how confederation will happen. GOP is trying Dem patience.
How America Fractured Into Four Parts  People in the United States no longer agree on the nation’s purpose, values, history, or meaning. Is reconciliation possible?